Parisi Cafe – Kansas City Coffee Shop Review

Parisi Cafe – Kansas City Coffee Shop Review

“Great coffee is motivational.  Inspirational. Timeless moments are often shared over a cup.  So we take our coffee seriously.  Selecting, roasting and brewing it right is an art.  Parisi Coffee is our proud, passionate homage to our Italian heritage.  It’s also our way to share our delicious traditions with you, so you can start your own.  Sip, savor, enjoy a good life.”
– Joseph and Salvatore Paris’

Parisi Artisan Coffee is another one of Kansas City’s great coffee roasters.  They have two cafes, one of which is located right inside Union Station.  My wife and I took our kids to Science City, at Union Station, for a fun day of educational activities.  If you have kids and have never been to Science City, I highly recommend going on during the week, right after lunch.  We got there not too long before an elementary school field trip was leaving, and once they were gone I swear we had the whole place to ourselves!

 

 

Before leaving Union Station, I had to get some coffee.  You physically can’t go there and not get some of the AMAZING stuff that Parisi Café has offer.  This is where I had my very first Ethiopian Sidamo, and of course, the rest was history.

At first glance, Parisi Café doesn’t look all that big.  There’s a few tables and chairs  just outside the doors, and you might think… “hmm, I don’t think I want to get coffee here, there’s no where to sit.”  But when you walk in, the café wraps all the way around to the back, and there’s a ton of seating, along with a nice bright welcoming vibe.  Not to mention the sweet aroma of incredible coffee.

 

 

The drip coffee they were offering was their Costa Rica, but they were offering a wide variety of other coffees as a pour over, so I decided on the Ethiopia Yirgacheffe.  The Ethiopia Yirgacheffe is a light roast, and a washed coffee., which produces a good clean tasting coffee bean.  I was torn between this one and their whiskey barrel aged coffee, which the barista said was his personal favorite.  I can sometimes be a little scared to try things that are different, so I decided to wait and try the whiskey barrel coffee on my next visit.

 

 

The bubbling you see on the top of the coffee grounds is called the bloom.  When hot water first touches the coffee, it releases carbon dioxide, which gives coffee that bitter taste.  Letting the coffee “bloom” for roughly 30 seconds gets rid of that bitterness, and it also smells REALLY GOOD!

 

 

The down side to getting the pour over is that you have to wait a little longer for your coffee, but the results are worth it!  Nothing is as fresh as a pour over!

After a few minutes, my coffee was finished and it was time to drink up.  The other great thing about the pour over is that the water has time to cool off just enough to not be way too hot to drink right away, so you can enjoy it right after brewing!

My first few sips of this coffee, I wasn’t sure if I was drinking the Sidamo or the Yirgacheffe.  I was tasting chocolate, and berries, much like the Sidamo.  But after a few more sips, I decided that it was in fact the Yirgacheffe.  I started tasting more citrus and fruit flavors.  The tasting notes on this coffee are stone fruit, lemon, and mango.  I could definitely taste the lemon, and there was also a bit of some other fruit that I just couldn’t seem to figure out.  I want to say maybe a mixture of mango and cherry.   It was absolutely incredible, and by far, my new favorite coffee.

 

 

I’ve yet to have a bad tasting coffee from Parisi.  The Yirgacheffe was so good, I couldn’t leave without getting a second cup for the drive home.  So I decided to get a cup of their drip coffee.  It was also very good, but nothing compared to the pour over I’d just had.  Really, its’ just an excuse to go back for a second cup.

 

 

 

 

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